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Virologica Sinica, 29 (6) : 327-342, 2014
Review
Ocular herpes: the pathophysiology, management and treatment of herpetic eye diseases
Department of Microbiology, Biochemistry & Molecular Genetics Rutgers, Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School, New Jersey 07103, USA
 Correspondence: zhuhu@njms.rutgers.edu
(4114.88KB)  
Abstract
Herpesviruses are a prominent cause of human viral disease, second only to the cold and influenza viruses. Most herpesvirus infections are mild or asymptomatic. However, when the virus invades the eye, a number of pathologies can develop and its associated sequelae have become a considerable source of ocular morbidity. The most common culprits of herpetic eye disease are the herpes simplex virus (HSV), varicella zoster virus (VZV), and cytomegalovirus (CMV). While primary infection can produce ocular disease, the most destructive manifestations tend to arise from recurrent infection. These recurrent infections can wreck devastating effects and lead to irreversible vision loss accompanied by a decreased quality of life, increased healthcare usage, and signifi cant cost burden. Unfortunately, no method currently exists to eradicate herpesviruses from the body after infection. Treatment and management of herpes-related eye conditions continue to revolve around antiviral drugs, although corticosteroids, interferons, and other newer therapies may also be appropriate depending on the disease presentation. Ultimately, the advent of effective vaccines will be crucial to preventing herpesvirus diseases altogether and cutting the incidence of ocular complications.
Received: 15 Dec 2014  Accepted: 6 Nov 2014  Published online: 1 Dec 2014
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