Citation: Suqin Duan, Wei Zhang, Yongjie Li, Yanyan Li, Yuan Zhao, Weihua Jin, Quan Liu, Mingxue Li, Wenting Sun, Lixiong Chen, Hongjie Xu, Jie Tang, Jinghan Hou, Zijun Deng, Fengmei Yang, Shaohui Ma, Zhanlong He. Coxsackievirus B3 HFMD animal models in Syrian hamster and rhesus monkey .VIROLOGICA SINICA, 2024, 39(2) : 290-300.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.virs.2024.02.001

Coxsackievirus B3 HFMD animal models in Syrian hamster and rhesus monkey

  • Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is the pathogen causing hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), which manifests across a spectrum of clinical severity from mild to severe. However, CVB3-infected mouse models mainly demonstrate viral myocarditis and pancreatitis, failing to replicate human HFMD symptoms. Although several enteroviruses have been evaluated in Syrian hamsters and rhesus monkeys, there is no comprehensive data on CVB3. In this study, we have first tested the susceptibility of Syrian hamsters to CVB3 infection via different routes. The results showed that Syrian hamsters were successfully infected with CVB3 by intraperitoneal injection or nasal drip, leading to nasopharyngeal colonization, acute severe pathological injury, and typical HFMD symptoms. Notably, the nasal drip group exhibited a longer viral excretion cycle and more severe pathological damage. In the subsequent study, rhesus monkeys infected with CVB3 through nasal drips also presented signs of HFMD symptoms, viral excretion, serum antibody conversion, viral nucleic acids and antigens, and the specific organ damages, particularly in the heart. Surprisingly, there were no significant differences in myocardial enzyme levels, and the clinical symptoms resembled those often associated with common, mild infections. In summary, the study successfully developed severe Syrian hamsters and mild rhesus monkey models for CVB3-induced HFMD. These models could serve as a basis for understanding the disease pathogenesis, conducting pre-trial prevention and evaluation, and implementing post-exposure intervention.

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    Coxsackievirus B3 HFMD animal models in Syrian hamster and rhesus monkey

      Corresponding author: Fengmei Yang, yangfenmei@imbcams.com.cn
      Corresponding author: Shaohui Ma, shaohuima@imbcams.com.cn
      Corresponding author: Zhanlong He, hzl@imbcams.com.cn
    • Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Medical Primate Research Center Peking Union Medical College, Yunnan Key Laboratory of Vaccine Research Development on Severe Infectious Disease, Kunming, 650118, China

    Abstract: Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is the pathogen causing hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), which manifests across a spectrum of clinical severity from mild to severe. However, CVB3-infected mouse models mainly demonstrate viral myocarditis and pancreatitis, failing to replicate human HFMD symptoms. Although several enteroviruses have been evaluated in Syrian hamsters and rhesus monkeys, there is no comprehensive data on CVB3. In this study, we have first tested the susceptibility of Syrian hamsters to CVB3 infection via different routes. The results showed that Syrian hamsters were successfully infected with CVB3 by intraperitoneal injection or nasal drip, leading to nasopharyngeal colonization, acute severe pathological injury, and typical HFMD symptoms. Notably, the nasal drip group exhibited a longer viral excretion cycle and more severe pathological damage. In the subsequent study, rhesus monkeys infected with CVB3 through nasal drips also presented signs of HFMD symptoms, viral excretion, serum antibody conversion, viral nucleic acids and antigens, and the specific organ damages, particularly in the heart. Surprisingly, there were no significant differences in myocardial enzyme levels, and the clinical symptoms resembled those often associated with common, mild infections. In summary, the study successfully developed severe Syrian hamsters and mild rhesus monkey models for CVB3-induced HFMD. These models could serve as a basis for understanding the disease pathogenesis, conducting pre-trial prevention and evaluation, and implementing post-exposure intervention.

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