. doi: 10.1016/j.virs.2024.02.002
Citation: Xinxin Cui, Jinhuan Ma, Zifeng Pang, Lingzhi Chi, Cuishan Mai, Hanlin Liu, Ming Liao, Hailiang Sun. The evolution, pathogenicity and transmissibility of quadruple reassortant H1N2 swine influenza virus in China: A potential threat to public health .VIROLOGICA SINICA, 2024, 39(2) : 205-217.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.virs.2024.02.002

中国四重重组H1N2猪流感病毒的进化、致病性和传播力:对公共卫生的潜在威胁

  • 猪被认为是流感病毒的“中间宿主”或“混合容器”,可以产生具有大流行潜力的毒株。从2020年到2021年,我们在中国南部的广东、云南和贵州以及中国北部的河南和山东的养猪场进行了猪H1N2流感(swH1N2)病毒监测。我们系统地分析了swH1N2病毒的进化和致病性,并对其复制和传播能力进行了表征。分离的病毒是四重重组H1N2病毒,含有来自pdm/09 H1N1 (PB2、PB1、PA和NP基因)、三重重组猪流感(NS基因)、欧亚禽类(HA和M基因)和最近人源H3N2 (NA基因)谱系的基因。SW/188/20和SW/198/20的NA、PB2和NP与A/Guangdong/Yue Fang277/2017 (H3N2)具有较高的基因相似性。swH1N2的HA基因具有较高的进化速率。分离的5株swH1N2病毒在人、犬和猪细胞以及小鼠的鼻甲、气管和肺中都能有效地复制。A/swine/Shandong/198/2020在猪的呼吸道中可有效复制,并在猪群中有效传播。总的来说,这些当前流行的swH1N2病毒具有人畜共患的潜力,强调了加强swH1N2病毒监测的必要性。

The evolution, pathogenicity and transmissibility of quadruple reassortant H1N2 swine influenza virus in China: A potential threat to public health

  • Swine are regarded as “intermediate hosts” or “mixing vessels” of influenza viruses, capable of generating strains with pandemic potential. From 2020 to 2021, we conducted surveillance on swine H1N2 influenza (swH1N2) viruses in swine farms located in Guangdong, Yunnan, and Guizhou provinces in southern China, as well as Henan and Shandong provinces in northern China. We systematically analyzed the evolution and pathogenicity of swH1N2 isolates, and characterized their replication and transmission abilities. The isolated viruses are quadruple reassortant H1N2 viruses containing genes from pdm/09 H1N1 (PB2, PB1, PA and NP genes), triple-reassortant swine (NS gene), Eurasian Avian-like (HA and M genes), and recent human H3N2 (NA gene) lineages. The NA, PB2, and NP of SW/188/20 and SW/198/20 show high gene similarities to A/Guangdong/Yue Fang277/2017 (H3N2). The HA gene of swH1N2 exhibits a high evolutionary rate. The five swH1N2 isolates replicate efficiently in human, canine, and swine cells, as well as in the turbinate, trachea, and lungs of mice. A/swine/Shandong/198/2020 strain efficiently replicates in the respiratory tract of pigs and effectively transmitted among them. Collectively, these current swH1N2 viruses possess zoonotic potential, highlighting the need for strengthened surveillance of swH1N2 viruses.

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    The evolution, pathogenicity and transmissibility of quadruple reassortant H1N2 swine influenza virus in China: A potential threat to public health

      Corresponding author: Ming Liao, mliao@scau.edu.cn
      Corresponding author: Hailiang Sun, hsun@scau.edu.cn
    • a. College of Veterinary Medicine, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, 510642, China;
    • b. Key Laboratory of Zoonosis Control and Prevention of Guangdong Province, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, 510642, China;
    • c. National and Regional Joint Engineering Laboratory for Medicament of Zoonosis Prevention and Control, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, 510642, China;
    • d. Shandong Vocational Animal Science and Veterinary College, Weifang, 261061, China;
    • e. Institute of Animal Health, Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Guangzhou, 510640, China

    Abstract: Swine are regarded as “intermediate hosts” or “mixing vessels” of influenza viruses, capable of generating strains with pandemic potential. From 2020 to 2021, we conducted surveillance on swine H1N2 influenza (swH1N2) viruses in swine farms located in Guangdong, Yunnan, and Guizhou provinces in southern China, as well as Henan and Shandong provinces in northern China. We systematically analyzed the evolution and pathogenicity of swH1N2 isolates, and characterized their replication and transmission abilities. The isolated viruses are quadruple reassortant H1N2 viruses containing genes from pdm/09 H1N1 (PB2, PB1, PA and NP genes), triple-reassortant swine (NS gene), Eurasian Avian-like (HA and M genes), and recent human H3N2 (NA gene) lineages. The NA, PB2, and NP of SW/188/20 and SW/198/20 show high gene similarities to A/Guangdong/Yue Fang277/2017 (H3N2). The HA gene of swH1N2 exhibits a high evolutionary rate. The five swH1N2 isolates replicate efficiently in human, canine, and swine cells, as well as in the turbinate, trachea, and lungs of mice. A/swine/Shandong/198/2020 strain efficiently replicates in the respiratory tract of pigs and effectively transmitted among them. Collectively, these current swH1N2 viruses possess zoonotic potential, highlighting the need for strengthened surveillance of swH1N2 viruses.

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